What Are You Counting?

Every careerpreneur is fundamentally in the numbers business. (And I mean that in the legal sense of the word!) We’re constantly counting something, be it: calls and pitches (how many were made vs. how many are needed to close a sale), sales (how many sales were made plus what was the size of each sale); clients (how many clients do you have vs. how many do you want/need for a thriving business); time (how much time is needed to complete a task or project vs. how much time do you have available to do said), and money (money earned, lost, saved, spent, and invested). Numbers are extremely valuable barometers because numbers never lie! The numbers are what they are. Ultimately, numbers tell the most objective story of success or failure. But as I recently discovered, it really depends upon how you define “success” and “failure.” From what I learned from planning the Financial Intimacy Conference, the relationship between numbers, success and failure are dependent on what you are measuring when you count, what you determine the measurement to mean, and how you tie that measurement to your identity. Let me explain. (Continue...

The Root of It All

After more than a year of planning, it happened…the Financial Intimacy Conference launched this past week in New York City! It was a tremendous success and more satisfying than I could have imagined. Three days later, I remain delirious with excitement — and from exhaustion! In forthcoming posts, I’ll share some of the surprising lessons I learned from producing and curating a project of this scale, such as the “vision within the vision” and related to that “the difference between impact and vision.” But there’s one lesson I am just itching to share right now: My deepening awareness that what contributes most to one’s success and satisfaction is invisible to others. Manisha Thakor, one of the speakers on the 2011-2012 Financial Intimacy Conference tour, reminded me of this via an analogy she shared regarding a tree. She described the role of the tree’s trunk, leaves, and roots as it relates to our relationship with money and how we are undergoing a shift from focusing on the trunks and leaves (what you can see) to the roots (what you cannot). Her story further reminded me of a book I’ve re-read several times by Joel Goldsmith, “Invisible Supply.” (Continued...