What if Goal Setting and New Year’s Resolutions Weren’t About the Future?

What if Goal Setting and New Year’s Resolutions Weren’t About the Future?

Did you just do a double-take? Are you wondering if the headline contains a typo? Given that it’s the top of the year and you’re likely laser-focused on what you want to be different (better, perhaps?) in the days, weeks, and months ahead, it may seem preposterous of me to suggest that goals and resolutions aren’t about the future. After all, what’s the purpose of setting goals and declaring New Year’s resolutions if not to make tomorrow different than today and yesterday? Yes, for a myriad of reasons having goals is important: Goals ensure you don’t live passively – choosing to let life happen to you, rather than you planning what happens Goals prompt you to articulate and crystallize the desires you hold in your head and heart Goals inspire forward movement Goals help you plan for what you want and prepare for the unexpected Goals encourage focus so that saying “yes/no” to opportunities and distractions is less emotional and more strategic Goals hold you accountable for your choices Goals give your days, weeks, and months a sense of purpose Goals provide metrics for you to track and measure But let’s face it, the above (albeit short) list doesn’t contain anything you don’t already know about the power of having goals. However, what you may not have heard before is this: Goals aren’t about the future. Based upon the barrage of goal-centric messages you receive, especially during this time of year, you’d be hard pressed to believe otherwise. And, I suspect your approach to goal-setting reflects such; whether your goal is to lose weight, save more money, get out...

One Step Forward, Two Steps Back & Why Mindset Matters

“Are you working toward business owner goals with a self-employment mindset.” Tara Gentile I’ve talked about the importance of and the role of mindset when it comes to reaching your goals here. So, I understand quite well that there exists a powerful connection between one’s mindset and the successful achievement of your goals. But last week, Tara Gentile, my business strategist and the creator of the Quiet Power Strategy, took this connection to a whole new level for me and wrote a piece that just rocked my world. In it, she raises the above question and I haven’t been able to stop mulling over it ever since. On so many levels, it is such a powerful question. Sterling is an S-corp; so, based on my tax status, I own a business. But if you pulled back the curtain and unpacked how I have made some business decisions, those would clearly fall in the self-employment mode. Neither her post nor the epiphany it held for me is about whether owning a business is better than being self-employed. That’s a personal and strategic business choice. However, it is about this: That moment when you realize you think you’re behaving one way when in fact you aren’t! Perhaps this disconnect is behind why some of the moments I declared were my tipping points, didn’t actually tip my business forward to the next level like I wanted! Can you relate? After all, you don’t need to have a business to benefit from exploring whether there is a mismatch between your goals and the mindset you’re relying on to achieve them. If you have...
What if You Don’t Know What You’re Missing?

What if You Don’t Know What You’re Missing?

For Christmas, I got a TV. I can just imagine the look on your face right about now as you read that statement. If you don’t know my television history, your look is probably accompanied by a question along the lines of, “and what does that have to do with me?” And if you do know my story, your reaction is either, “well, it’s about time!” Or, you are just as shocked as I was as I looked at a box, hidden in plain sight, containing a 32″ flat screen TV asking, “What’s this?” I kid you not… In a moment, I’ll flush out what my lovely new TV has to do with you, but first some context: It’s not that I didn’t own a television (although I don’t watch it much); it’s just that I’ve had my now “old” set since 1989 – rabbit ears and all! And because I don’t have a cable subscription, I also have the digital TV converter box. Go ahead and laugh, it’s okay – But my “old” TV worked just fine. However, now that I have this fancy-dancy thing, I can’t believe what I’ve been missing. The picture quality is AMAZING! The colors are crisp, clear and vibrant. TV watching in my own house never looked so good. New Year Ruminations My Christmas present got me to thinking about clichés, comfort and paths that go unexplored. There are two popular clichés: Cliché #1 – You can’t miss what you never had. Cliché #2 – You don’t know what you have until it’s gone. The major problem with the above is this: What...
The Invisible Voices Always Have Something to Say

The Invisible Voices Always Have Something to Say

The first thing I do when I get a request for a TV appearance is jot down three to five talking points; the second thing I do is think about what I am going to wear. The latter isn’t as girly or superficial as it seems. What we wear is, after all, part of our communication strategy. And from my dear friend, Sharon, who is a celebrity stylist, I have learned that what looks good to the naked-eye doesn’t always translate well onscreen – especially with HDtv! Her point: Use your attire to let your personality shine, but not at the expense of your message, mission, and movement. Channeling Sting & The Police As I prepare for any speaking engagement, especially one that will be captured on film, I hear Sharon’s “voice” in my head saying things like “remember the colors that I told you look good on-air; avoid distracting patterns; what have you worn on-air recently; be mindful of the dress or skirt length especially if you are sitting down,” etc. I call her voice my “fashion director.” But I hear other “voices” throughout my day, as well, whether I’m doing a TV appearance, writing, coaching a client, conducting a training seminar, or hanging with my family and friends. These “voices” just didn’t have names until two weeks ago. I had the awesome pleasure and privilege of being both a speaker and onsite coach at Alexia Vernon’s inaugural Moxie Camp a few weeks ago. One of the many benefits of the weekend was sitting in on the other speakers’ sessions, such as the fabulous Jenny Blake’s. She had...
Focused, On Purpose, But a Little Lopsided?

Focused, On Purpose, But a Little Lopsided?

Did you start the year full of energy, raring to go? Now that we are six weeks in, how is it going? Have you settled into a groove that has you on pace to achieve the goals you declared at the top of the year? Or, has the euphoria subsided a bit and with it your tempo and effort – thus taking you out of your groove? If you said a little of both because you are feeling focused, on purpose, yet slightly lopsided, you are not alone. This idea of being lopsided came to me during a recent financial coaching session. What I noticed with my clients is a pattern I recognize with others, and it’s not just confined to money. But, I’m going to use money and the visual aspect of an exercise to illustrate my point. I use this all the time with my coaching clients and workshop participants, and it will be familiar to readers of my book as well. It’s called the “Financial Wheel:” Draw or envision a circle; divide the circle into four sections by drawing a horizontal and vertical line; label the upper-left-hand quadrant “Earn,” the upper-right-hand quadrant “Save,” the lower-right-hand quadrant “Invest,” and the lower left-hand quadrant “Spend.” Earn, save, invest, and spend represent the four things, very broadly, that any of us regardless of income level or asset wealth can do with our money. However, when most people make financial goals they concentrate on the right side of the wheel – save and invest. But they don’t hone in on and create goals for the left side of the wheel...