So Much Information; Too Little Insight

So Much Information; Too Little Insight

Much of what I do involves working with people pondering a decision. The root of which either affects their finances or is affected by them. In other words, we pretty much end up talking about and strategizing on almost everything concerning life! “I have six figures sitting in a savings account earning a measly .015%; what should I do? “I need to invest; I have money to invest; I just don’t know where to begin and I don’t trust the stock market? “I’m lucky because I make more than enough, but I have poor savings habits.” “I need to get out of debt!” “How do I determine how much to save if we’re planning to buy a house, or start a family, or start a business, or….?” “I’m getting a divorce and have to start over…and he managed all our finances…” What’s Different is Actually the Same The decisions they are looking to make and the questions they are contemplating are varied. But when they come to me with these and other questions like these, they are yearning for the same thing: information. And even though they don’t say it specifically, they also want assurance said information will help them make the right decision. Gathering (more) information is usually what you do before making a decision; when you wish to increase your knowledge about a topic or issue; or when you simply want to feed your curiosity. I suspect when you choose to read my blog posts, that you, too, are yearning for information – at least to some degree. Likewise, you may want another outlet to confirm you...
Clarity Lessons From a Hedgehog

Clarity Lessons From a Hedgehog

In less than two weeks, the clock will strike midnight ushering in a New Year – a transformation that is typically accompanied by revelry and proclamations of resolutions and big, bold, goals. As I was thinking about the New Year, I thought of a hedgehog. Weird, right? However these spiny mammals can actually teach you and me a thing or two about how to prepare for success. Hedgehogs are known for their peculiar approach to foraging. They are also known for how they protect themselves when threatened: they roll into a tight ball. Setting aside the motive for why they do it, in an odd way, it is this practice of rolling into a tight ball — of going inside — that can help you when it comes to something that I believe is critical for sustainable success: having clarity. Are you clear about what you want? Are you clear about what you want to be different next year? Are you clear about what you want to change; how about what you want to stay the same? Are you clear about the deepest desires of your heart? How do you define clarity? What do you stand for; what are you willing to do (or what won’t you do) to make whatever you stand for happen? What do you value? What are your priorities? What are your goals? Do you feel so stuck that clarity seems like a luxury, rather than an absolute necessity? Clarity…the new sexy? I ask these questions because these (or variations thereof) are questions I’ve been pondering as I get ready to kick start 2013. And...
Bounce: A Counter-Intuitive Look at Setbacks

Bounce: A Counter-Intuitive Look at Setbacks

I write this post on the heels of experiencing a setback. And honestly, I couldn’t have written this in the midst of it; it was just too raw. I was too emotionally attached to the latest thing that didn’t unfold as I planned or envisioned and spent far more time than I care to admit traveling down the rabbit-hole of woes-me. Can you relate? It’s a rhetorical question, I know. After all, we may each deal with disappointment differently but none of us are immune from the vicissitudes of life. When it’s your turn to experience a setback or disappointment, well, it is just your turn. But man, when you’re in the midst of it, doesn’t it tend to feel like you are in the vortex – with no bottom –  all by your lonesome? The Emotional Danger The danger with setbacks is that the length of time you remain steeped in your emotional reactions to what is going on, is the same amount of time that you are “blind” to the teachable moment embedded in each disappointment. In other words, you prolong your ability to turn your emotional response into an objective evaluation of not just what’s going on but also on what comes next. Therefore, you can… …potentially miss the “signs” (and message) the setback has for you. What I realized with my recent setback was that I was misinterpreting the delay. I needed to recall the new-age adage: “Every delay is not a denial.” Signs Posing as Questions=Message What I also realized is that all setbacks slow you down…for a reason. Perhaps the message is: you...