Same Road. Different Lane.

Same Road. Different Lane.

Ooh, I’ve been looking forward to publishing this post for awhile. I’m excited to share some news…I’m excited about what this moment (a year in the making) signifies for the road ahead. I am writing to share a few small, subtle shifts that will impact how I serve you. But first, some context… As I’ve shared from time to time, I’ve been working with Stephanie Pollock, business activator & leadership coach.  This time last year, she and I embarked on a journey with me having no idea, really, where it would lead. I was simply crystal clear that: a) something needed to change, and b) I needed help. It was time to redirect the “ship” and reach my tipping point. To say that working with Stephanie has been (and continues to be) a blessing beyond measure is truly an understatement. Little did I know back then that my choice to work with her was an act of self-love – both for my business and me personally. While I am writing to share with you some important updates. This isn’t just about me. My hope is that you’ll dig beneath the surface and ask yourself: “Am I so focused on making the BIG moves, decisions or (fill in the blank) that I’m overlooking the power of making small, subtle shifts?” Small really is the new significant! Retiring sterlingchoices.net As you may have noticed, we have a new online home and a modified home-page. Yay! We haven’t done a complete design overhaul and a few pages still need to be updated; all that is forthcoming. But after ten years, I decided...

The Dumb Money Effect

Carl Richards is a certified financial planner. He writes regularly for the New York Times blog, Bucks, doing an excellent job of making financial principles more understandable via his musings and fabulously illustrated sketches. Yesterday, as I read his latest post, “When Your Money is the Dumb Money,” I couldn’t help but wonder what the equivalent of the dumb money phenomenon is when it comes to how you and I manage our careers. On Wall Street money tends to be categorized in two ways: “smart money” or “dumb money.” The latter is a common sentiment expressed by Wall Street professionals to describe the typical behavior of individual (aka retail) investors. More so than Wall Street professionals (traders, investment bankers, hedge fund managers, portfolio managers, etc.), retail investors typically react to past performance than to anticipated growth. The result: They tend to buy high and sell low; when it is best to buy low, sell high. Every investor is aware of the buy low, sell high investment principle and discipline; yet not every investor follows this practice when it is most warranted. Why? Because they are allowing their emotions to dictate their reaction to the market’s volatility. (Read...