Vulnerability is Sexy…Really!

Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day…Happy V-Day! Last week, I shared how I thought the holiday wasn’t just for expressing love for and to another person. With this question – “How in love with your life are you right now?” – I was encouraging you to think about this day differently than you may have previously. I suggested it was an opportunity to also express love and gratitude to and for life. And, I gave you some questions to ponder. As I have been working through those same questions, one word keeps surfacing: vulnerable. Merriam-Webster defines vulnerable as “capable of being physically or emotionally wounded, or open to attack or damage.” Yikes! None of that sounds pleasant. No wonder we have a hard time being vulnerable with each other. But it’s good for you Yet, if you think about the richest, closest relationships you have – the ones where you feel the deepest connection – I bet there’s one thing these relationships all have in common: mutual vulnerability. In these relationships there’s open (even if tentative at times) communication whereby you share and disclose things you’d never open up for discussion with others. And when it comes to love and money, there’s just no escaping the necessity for vulnerability. It’s all about exposing the good, bad, and ugly. Or, as my friend and colleague Manisha Thakor would say, it’s about “getting financially naked.” And as researcher, Brene Brown, Ph.D., says, “Vulnerability is the birthplace of innovation, creativity and change.” I really like Dr. Brown’s take on vulnerability. It’s the perfect perspective when it comes to embracing the good that comes from being...

The Root of It All

After more than a year of planning, it happened…the Financial Intimacy Conference launched this past week in New York City! It was a tremendous success and more satisfying than I could have imagined. Three days later, I remain delirious with excitement — and from exhaustion! In forthcoming posts, I’ll share some of the surprising lessons I learned from producing and curating a project of this scale, such as the “vision within the vision” and related to that “the difference between impact and vision.” But there’s one lesson I am just itching to share right now: My deepening awareness that what contributes most to one’s success and satisfaction is invisible to others. Manisha Thakor, one of the speakers on the 2011-2012 Financial Intimacy Conference tour, reminded me of this via an analogy she shared regarding a tree. She described the role of the tree’s trunk, leaves, and roots as it relates to our relationship with money and how we are undergoing a shift from focusing on the trunks and leaves (what you can see) to the roots (what you cannot). Her story further reminded me of a book I’ve re-read several times by Joel Goldsmith, “Invisible Supply.” (Continued...